Debates

Economist Debates adapt the Oxford style of debating to a  forum. The format was made famous by the 186-year-old Oxford Union and has been practised by heads of state, prominent intellectuals and galvanising figures from across the cultural spectrum.

It revolves around an assertion that is defended on one side (the "proposer") and assailed on another (the "opposition") in a contest hosted and overseen by a moderator.

Each side has three chances to persuade the audience: opening, rebuttal and closing.

In Economist Debates, proposer and opposition each consist of a single speaker, experts in the issue at hand. We also invite featured guests to comment on the debate not to take sides, but to provide context and informed perspective on the subject.

Those attending an Oxford-style debate participate in two ways:
a) by voting to determine the debate’s winner
b) and by addressing comments to the moderator

As a participant, you are encouraged to vote.

You can also direct your comments to the moderator. These should be relevant to the motion, the speakers’ statements or the observations of featured guests. And they must be addressed directly to the moderator, who will single out the most compelling for discussion by the speakers.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       



IS THE YOUNG GENERATION PROPERLY SKILLED TO MEET TOMORROW'S CHALLENGES?
Steve Bainbridge says YES - Michael Jacobides says NO
Results

 



SHOULD GREECE PROCEED WITH A UNILATERAL DELIMITATION OF AN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE?
Theodore Kariotis says YES - Christos Rozakis says NO
Results

 



IS THE GREEK DEBT ONLY A GREEK ISSUE?
Klaus-Peter Willsch says YES - Graeme Maxton says NO
Results

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